• team

    023. Koningin Máxima

    023. Queen Máxima

  • team

    025. Blauwe reiger

    025. Blue heron

  • team

    027. Tommie

    027. Tommy

  • team

    036. Ella

    036. Ella

  • team

    088. Ooievaar

    088. White stork

  • team

    097. Roos

    099. Rose

  • team

    098. Fuut met 2 jongen

    098. Great crested grebe with 2 youngsters

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Portraits page 1

023. Queen Máxima

Only her beautiful South American eyes.

Drawing after a photo

025. Blue Heron

Ardea cinerea Linnaeus 1758. Eng. grey heron. Dutch. blauwe reiger.

Latinn cinereus meant ash-colored, also: grey. So the blue heron is an ‘ash-colored’, a bird with the grey colour of the ash of a cigar (Latin cinis: ash). He is named after the blue-grey top in many langgages, although in older names more often grey than blue. In the Nederlands there was a 'grauwe reyger' (grey heron) in 1363. Belon 1555 had French heron cendré: ash-colored heron, and heron gris. Gesner 1555 writes that he is often just called ‘heron', but sometimes with the addition 'grey' and ' blue' (“aut cinereae coeruleaeque cognomen adijcitur”, p.205). ‘The Germans call him grauwer reiger and blauwer reiger’. Gesner himself calls him ardea cinerea, a name which comes via Ray 1694 to Linnaeus. The emphasis on grey is correct: the top is more grey than blue, besides the bird as a whole makes a grey impression especially in grey wheather. But grey does not do justice to the rest of the colors, particularly in spring. ‘As-colored heron’ goes back via Plinius to Aristotel. He had Greek erodios pellos, 'led colored', so dark grey heron (for erodios see ardea). Given its colour it could also be the quck, nycticorax nycticorax, but Aristotel writes that he is active during the day: the quack mostly hunt during the night.

Source: WNVE.nl

Drawing after a photo

027. Tommie

Came as Beagle puppy and left us after 16.5 years as a fourth child.

Location: Lofoten 101, 3524 EP Utrecht, The Netherlands

Drawing after a picture

036. Ella

Ella van den Berg-van Kippersluis. Born on May 5, 1953 in de Bilt. We were married on February 20, 1974and have three childre, Eva, Peter en Paul, a son in law Jurrit en two grand children Roos and Saar. This drawing is after a picture of September 2018, when we had a cosy and lovely lunch in the sun in restaurant Pakhuus te Oudeschild, Texel.

Location: Oudeschild, Texel, The Netherlands

Drawing after a picture

088. White Stork

The white stork (Ciconia ciconia) is a large bird in the stork family, Ciconiidae. Its plumage is mainly white, with black on the bird's wings. Adults have long red legs and long pointed red beaks, and measure on average 100–115 cm (39–45 in) from beak tip to end of tail, with a 155–215 cm (61–85 in) wingspan. The two subspecies, which differ slightly in size, breed in Europe (north to Finland), northwestern Africa, southwestern Asia (east to southern Kazakhstan) and southern Africa. The white stork is a long-distance migrant, wintering in Africa from tropical Sub-Saharan Africa to as far south as South Africa, or on the Indian subcontinent. When migrating between Europe and Africa, it avoids crossing the Mediterranean Sea and detours via the Levant in the east or the Strait of Gibraltar in the west, because the air thermals on which it depends for soaring do not form over water.

A carnivore, the white stork eats a wide range of animal prey, including insects, fish, amphibians, reptiles, small mammals and small birds. It takes most of its food from the ground, among low vegetation, and from shallow water. It is a monogamous breeder, but does not pair for life. Both members of the pair build a large stick nest, which may be used for several years. Each year the female can lay one clutch of usually four eggs, which hatch asynchronously 33–34 days after being laid. Both parents take turns incubating the eggs and both feed the young. The young leave the nest 58–64 days after hatching, and continue to be fed by the parents for a further 7–20 days.

The white stork has been rated as least concern by the International Union for Conservation of Nature (IUCN). It benefited from human activities during the Middle Ages as woodland was cleared, but changes in farming methods and industrialisation saw it decline and disappear from parts of Europe in the 19th and early 20th centuries. Conservation and reintroduction programs across Europe have resulted in the white stork resuming breeding in the Netherlands, Belgium, Switzerland, Sweden and the United Kingdom. It has few natural predators, but may harbour several types of parasite; the plumage is home to chewing lice and feather mites, while the large nests maintain a diverse range of mesostigmatic mites. This conspicuous species has given rise to many legends across its range, of which the best-known is the story of babies being brought by storks.

Source: Wikipedia

Location: Waalseweg 22, 3999 NS Tull en Het Waal, the Netherlands

Drawing after a picture

097. Rose

I was unhappy about my portrait drawings for a long time. "Spotty", my wife said. This is the first portrait which is heading in the right direction. Tried new techniques, direction photo realism.

Location: Lofoten 101, 3524 EP Utrecht, the Netherlands

Drawing after a picture

098. Great crested grebe with 2 youngsters

The great crested grebe is the largest member of the grebe family found in the Old World, with some larger species residing in the Americas. They measure 46–51 cm (18–20 in) long with a 59–73 cm (23–29 in) wingspan and weigh 0.9 to 1.5 kg (2.0 to 3.3 lb).[8][9] It is an excellent swimmer and diver, and pursues its fish prey underwater. The adults are unmistakable in summer with head and neck decorations. In winter, this is whiter than most grebes, with white above the eye, and a pink bill.

The young are distinctive because their heads are striped black and white. They lose these markings when they become adults.

Source: Wikipedia

Location: Krommerijnpark West, Utrecht, The Netherlands

Drawing after a photo by Erik Stekelenburg

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Love for Domstad, architecture, photography and computers meet in my realistic drawings.

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